Rebecca’s Words Are Nothing Like the Sun

When Rebecca gave me my last set of words, I called her a bad name (not to her face, of course). The words she chose for me were ‘methinks’, ‘it’ (a nice one) and ‘vouchsafe’. Selected from her new Shakespearean words kit, there was little I could do with them but attempt a sonnet. So, her you have my lowly attempt (which is not actually a Shakespearean sonnet because I cheated with the rhyme pattern).

 

Methinks my friend Rebecca is too smart

For her own good – and mine – it breaks my heart.

She challenges to me write but gives me rules:

I must make use of words best meant for fools.

I dither and I sweat how best to work

Them into poem form, yet not berserk.

Some sense is needed, else my readers’ ire

Will harshly rise and from blog they’ll retire.

And so I boil and toil upon my sonnet

Labouring e’er so hard and long upon it.

Vouchsafe one thing though, last laugh I shall cackle:

soon I’ll choose words to raise Rebecca’s hackle!

 

(Poem by Sally Murphy, 2016)

Cottesloe Beach Skipping Rhyme

NB: This post contains instructions. If you just want to read the poem, scroll to the bottom of the page!
At the last tag, Sally gave me DANCE, ONE and CARAMEL.
Cottesloe Beach (in Western Australia) has recently had lots of visitors to see Sculpture By the Sea. This is a poem about the beach and how I always find the sand so hot and the water so cold, and how there’s always someone ready to splash me with the cold seawater before I’m ready to ease myself in …
When I was at school, my favourite skipping rhymes were the ones with a constant cycle of skippers moving through the turning rope. Here we go!
First: assemble your ‘Skipping Rhyme’ kit.
Ingredients:
  • A long skipping rope, with a bit of weight to it.
  • A sunny day and a large patch of grass to skip on. (A park is a good option.)
  • At least five people — two to turn the long rope, one person to skip, and one or more people ready to run in and join the skipper. Note: There will be two people skipping at the same time occasionally.
  • The words to ‘Cottesloe Beach Skipping Rhyme’ (see below).

Method:

  1. Two people start turning the skipping rope. One person skips. When you have a rhythm going, everyone starts chanting the skipping rhyme (see below).
  2. Where there are names in the rhyme, you need to replace them with the names of the people actually skipping instead.:-)
  3. Everyone waiting for a turn to skip lines up in a queue just beyond the skipping rope (so they don’t get whacked by the turning rope) and the person at the head of the queue needs to be ready to run straight in and start skipping when the rhyme says ‘along comes Tran’
  4. Where the rhyme says ‘Run, Sally! Run!’ the first skipper needs to exit the skipping rope, leaving the second skipper behind, jumping on their own.
  5. Try to keep the rope turning and see how many people you can cycle through before it all crashes in a heap!

COTTESLOE BEACH SKIPPING RHYME

 

Sally at the beach                                     <— Replace ‘Sally’ with skipper’s name.
on the caramel sands,
hops to the water
with a hot sand dance.

Along comes Tran                                 <— Second skipper runs in & skips too.
looking for fun —
one cold splash!
Run, Sally! Run!                                    <— Sally exits.

 

Tran at the beach                                  <— Tran keeps skipping.
on the caramel sands,
hops to the water
with a hot sand dance.

Along comes Rebecca                            <— Another friend runs in & skips too.
looking for fun —
one cold splash!
Run, Tran! Run!                                   <— Tran exits.

 

Rebecca at the beach                           <— Rebecca keeps skipping …
on the caramel sands …

© REBECCA NEWMAN, 2016

New Words for Rebecca, and a Refresher

Hi there. If you are new to this blog, here’s a refresher. The two bloggers – me (Sally) and Rebecca Newman, take turns in challenging (or tormenting??)  each other to write a poem using the word or words which the other selects.

The poet can choose any form, any topic, any length, but they must use the allocated words somewhere in the poem.

Got it? Good. Here come the new words I am gifting to Rebecca. Watch this blog to see what she does with them. In the meantime youc an scroll down and see what we’ve come up in the past.

DSCN2043

 

Too Many Sleeps

When Rebecca gave me the words ‘envy’ and ‘run’ I wasn’t quite sure what to do with them, especially since envy is such a negative emotion. But as December ticked along, and I kept thinking I must get the poem written before Christmas, I started wondering if these were words I could use in a festive poem. Here’s the result.

Too Many Sleeps

Run, days, run!

Stop dragging leaden feet

And scurry, hurry, flurry

To Christmas Day.

 

Hop, days, hop!

From one to next to next

Quicker, slicker, ticker

To Christmas Day.

 

Skip, days, skip!

With speed Santa would envy

Racing, pacing, chasing

To Christmas Day.

 

Glide, days, glide

Like runners on a sleigh

Dash, slash, smash

To Christmas Day.

 

Merry Christmas!

 

Poem copyright Sally Murphy 2015

Beneath the Front Yard Lemon Tree

Sally gave me the words BENEATH, CLOSE and WEEKEND. The non-human character featured in this poem was inspired by a willy wagtail, a frequent visitor here, and I kind of wished I’d taken a photograph of him so I could have included it with the poem. But if I wait till I get the photo, the poem will never get posted …

BENEATH THE FRONT YARD LEMON TREE

There’s a weekend bird
that chats to me
beneath the front yard lemon tree.
He hops on rocks and
pecks at leaves
and tells me all his joys and woes.

We watch the sky
and feel the breeze
beneath the front yard lemon tree.
And spelling lists
and mental maths
seem far away and long ago.

My weekend bird
hops close to me
beneath the front yard lemon tree.
Though he’s a bird
and I’m a boy,
we swap our stories; off he goes.

© Rebecca Newman, 2015

Almost

You would think that by giving me just one word to incorporate, Rebecca could have relied on a prompt turnaround by me, but  once again I have been tied up in much busyness, and it was seeing Rebecca on the weekend at a wonderful conference that reminded me about my tardiness.

So, here is my poem, with apologies for lateness.

Almost

I almost

wrote about poetry

but that would be too meta.

I almost

wrote about Rebecca

but she wrote about me last time.

I almost

wrote about not knowing

what to write about, but that’s been done.

So instead

I wrote about all three things.

I’m almost too clever!

(Sally Murphy, 2015).