Hope

It’s been so long since Sally left words for me that you will have forgotten what the words were.

Here they are: HOPE SCULPTURE EDGY CONTEMPORARY.

And here’s the resulting poem, called ‘Hope.’ (I found this word combo the hardest Sally has given me. But I’m sure she would say that I deserved it after the Shakespearean tag I gave her earlier … )

HOPE

Where the shadow of the house meets the lavender pots
is a contemporary sculpture made from boots.
Out in the street someone calls, come on!
but the boys are edgy —
they’ve done this before.

They pull boots from the pile
and shake them
and hope the cobwebs are old.

© Rebecca Newman, 2016
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Really Estate

When Rebecca gave me the words thrilled, modern and inspired, I had no idea what I would do with them, though the word ‘thrilled’ seems to me so often prefaced with the word ‘really’. When I started work on the poem I had just been working on a blog post about repetition,  and wondered if I could somehow use the technique in this poem. It was as I started writing that the idea to repeat the word ‘really’ came to me, but it was only after I’d finished that I thought of the play on words with real/really estate.

Anyway, here’s the poem.

Really Estate
‘I am really thrilled to meet you
Follow me now. Come this way!’
Trilled the eager estate agent
At the home open today.

‘You will really be inspired
By the things that you will see
In this modern, marvellous mansion
Come along  now. Follow me!’

We were really very nervous
But we hurried down the hall.
Tried to ignore dirt and mildew
That was oozing from each wall.

Mum was really disconcerted
By the holes in every floor
And the eerie sounding creaking
Every time we touched a door.

Dad was really worried
By the cobwebs overhead
Plus the smell from the old kitchen
And the worse one in the shed.

But what really got me worried
And it would have scared you too
Was the ghostly weepy wailing
That was coming from the loo.

We were really rather hasty
As we raced out to the road
‘Wait!’ shrieked the poor agent,
‘I haven’t fully showed

How really really awesome
This lovely house can be.’
But her pleas on us were wasted
We had other homes to see.

(© Sally Murphy, 2015)

Taking a Stand

Sally really set me a challenge this time. I thought ‘independent’ would be the toughest word to work into a poem but actually ‘rough’ and ‘gone’ were much harder. I had already sketched out a lot of the poem before I realised that I was scratching my head to find the right word to rhyme with ‘gone’ and I began to think that perhaps a rhyming poem wasn’t such a grand idea after all. But it was too late to turn back …

In the end, here’s what I came up with!

Taking a Stand

I got up when the clock went off,
unasked, I tied my shoes.
I did the crossword by myself
by working out the clues.
I packed my bag without complaint —
my lunchbox and my rough
copy of my book review
and all the other stuff.
I caught the bus to school at eight,
I caught it home at three.
You’d gone to fetch the grandmas so
I chopped the spuds for tea.
I didn’t need reminding
to say ‘thank you’ and ‘please,’
I’m really INDEPENDENT and —
I choose
not
to
eat
these
peas
.

copyright Rebecca Newman 2014

Fond Farewell

Bye Mum!

We’re off!

I give her

The quickest of waves

Brushing past

Billy and Sam

As I race for the door.

I’m quick

But not quick enough.

Nothing can stop

a mother with a thirst

for embarrassing her offspring.

Wait, she orders.

You forgot something.

Mwah!

She plants a big kiss

on my  red cheek.

Billy and Sam snigger

As I wish

somebody would invent

mother-repellent.

 

Sally Murphy, 2014