Postal Nonsense

Rebecca only gave me three words this time: ghost, with and global.  I wrote the three words on a stickynote and thought they would do their magic on me, worming their way into a piece of poetic brilliance – or at least a piece of poetic averageness. But nothing happened. My mind played a bit with the alliteration of global ghost, and flickered briefly to global warming and the ghosts we might become if we don’t take stronger action, but that seemed a bit dire for this blog.

So, some weeks went by and the words were still just three words. Till my son asked me whatt heyw ere and I explained that I needed to put all three in a poem. “That’s easy!” he said: “There once was a ghost/Who got some post…” His words trailed off, but my mind started, at last, to tick away. Because I’ve been working on a workshop about forced rhyme, and there was one staring me in the face. “Hmm,” i thought. “I think I can do soemthing pretty corny here.” And the res, as they say, is history.

It’s not poetic brilliance, but it is a bit of fun, and perhaps an example of what happens when you try to force rhymes to a topic. (Sarcel? Thanks for that one, Rhymezone.)

Here’s my effort:

 

Postal NonsenseAdvance Sage 3

Can you exchange post

With a ghost?

Write mail

To a snail?

Send a letter

To a red setter?

Or a card

To a St Bernard?

Can you write a note

To a goat?

Send a global parcel

To a hawk’s sarcel?

 

(You’ll want to go

And look that up).

I guess you know

The answer’s NUP.

 

Poem copyright Sally Murphy, 2017

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A Homophonic Musing

Yet again I have been slow to meet the challenge Rebecca gave me. I have been lost in the depths of a doctoral thesis focussing on children’s poetry, as well as releasing two new books and working. Still, I shouldn’t neglect Poetry challenges!

Anyway, when I finally sat down and looked at the word Rebecca had given me:

foul all or use

I instantly thought about the homophone pair of fouls/fowl. It only took a few moments to realise that all four words were homophones, and so the idea for a homophone poem tickled my fancy. This is the result:

A Homophonic Musing

As I stand and look in awe

I know it’s neither oar or or

That I should use

When admiring ewes

And feathery fowl

Who are not foul.

My brain’s a metaphoric awl

That helps me manage pinpoint all

The different ways of spelling

Things I see and tales I’m telling.

 

Thanks for the challenge Rebecca. Watch out for new words coming your way.

(Poem copyright Sally Murphy, 2017)

Family Hound

It’s only been a few days since Rebecca gave me a new set of words, and I surprised myself by knowing instantly what to do with them. Maybe because this was an easier set than last time (when she gave me Shakespearean words) or maybe my muse was just having a good day.

The words she game me where am, spot and slip. As soon as I read them I had an image of a spotty dog. slipping and sliding around. Which lead to this:

I am Spot

Dotty hound

Grotty hound

Sometimes tangly

Knotty hound

 

I am Spot

Slippy hound

Yippy hound

Sometimes wet and

Drippy hound

 

I am Spot

Leapy hound

Creepy hound

Sometimes tired and

Sleepy hound.

 

I

am

Spot.

 

(Poem Copyright Sally Murphy, 2016)

Thanks for the words, Rebecca.

Really Estate

When Rebecca gave me the words thrilled, modern and inspired, I had no idea what I would do with them, though the word ‘thrilled’ seems to me so often prefaced with the word ‘really’. When I started work on the poem I had just been working on a blog post about repetition,  and wondered if I could somehow use the technique in this poem. It was as I started writing that the idea to repeat the word ‘really’ came to me, but it was only after I’d finished that I thought of the play on words with real/really estate.

Anyway, here’s the poem.

Really Estate
‘I am really thrilled to meet you
Follow me now. Come this way!’
Trilled the eager estate agent
At the home open today.

‘You will really be inspired
By the things that you will see
In this modern, marvellous mansion
Come along  now. Follow me!’

We were really very nervous
But we hurried down the hall.
Tried to ignore dirt and mildew
That was oozing from each wall.

Mum was really disconcerted
By the holes in every floor
And the eerie sounding creaking
Every time we touched a door.

Dad was really worried
By the cobwebs overhead
Plus the smell from the old kitchen
And the worse one in the shed.

But what really got me worried
And it would have scared you too
Was the ghostly weepy wailing
That was coming from the loo.

We were really rather hasty
As we raced out to the road
‘Wait!’ shrieked the poor agent,
‘I haven’t fully showed

How really really awesome
This lovely house can be.’
But her pleas on us were wasted
We had other homes to see.

(© Sally Murphy, 2015)

Rat Lullaby

Right. So. You might remember that Sally gave me SORDID and BUT to work into a poem. (Thank you, Sally. Hmm.)

We’ve had some little loud visitors in our roofspace recently and so I wrote this for them. I’m sure their mothers love them, even if I don’t.

Rat Lullaby

Scuttle to your sordid bed,
still your paws, rest your head.
Don’t twitch your whiskers, or ruckle your nose,
but sleep until dusk brings the day to a close.

(Rebecca Newman, 2015)

My Granny

It’s taken me quite some time to tackle Rebecca’s latest set of words. I’ve been busy with many things, but also find that sometimes I just have to wait for the muse to tell me what to do with a writing prompt. Today is that day! I must confess this poem is almost about me – I am a Granny, after all. But I don’t think I’m quite as energetic as this fictional Granny.

My Granny

My granny’s pretty groovy
If you saw her you’d agree
That she’s a grooving granny
Who is such a sight to see.

She is always energetic
Running here and dashing there
Till we all start to wonder
If she ever stops for air.

But there’s something I must tell you.
It’s a secret I can’t keep.
My granny does not stop moving,
Even when she is asleep!

Sally Murphy, 2014